Tuesday, 14 April 2020

THE BOAT CHURCH OF ST PETERS


St Peter's its plan reflects the shape of a boat

Curious Coast Small Gems: It was another blessed jaunt between Romney and Hythe on the Kent coast. We quite the beach of Greatstone for The Parade, a curious road of houses that runs parallel to the sea.

 And discovered St Peter's Church first built 1953 as a wooden hall situated a little further up Baldwin Road than the present church. At this time Greatstone was little more than shingle and sand dunes, with only a few houses, a railway station, and a holiday camp that had started just after World War 2.


The present church as opened April 1962 by Michael Ramsey, Archbishop of Canterbury. The shape of the church reflect the shape of a boat. The disciple Peter was a fisherman. The east end is rounded to be like the bow, and the west end tapers, and squared off to represent the stern.
We quite the beach of Greatstone for The Parade


With all our churches shut and locked the reflection of a discovery like St Peter’s is precious beyond measure.

CONTEXT FOOTNOTE 
Curious Coast Small Gems www.curiouscoast.co.uk
Now with time to reflect and revisit our 2000 photos, 5000 words and 70 drawings across 17 jaunts we’ve discovered some small places that deserve their own shout! This is one.

Wednesday, 8 April 2020

ROOSEVELT ISLAND, DUTCH SCHULTZ and CHARLES DICKENS


ROOSEVELT ISLAND and CHARLES DICKENS

Roosevelt Island is now the place of high rises and expensive private housing schemes. As a location it is very popular with folk who work at the UN, which is just across the East River on Manhattan.

Through the 19th century, the island housed several hospitals and a prison, which at one point held 1,700 inmates, twice its designed capacity. One eminent resident was Dutch Schultz.  Born Arthur Simon Flegenheimer, ‘Dutch’ was a New York mobster of the 1920s and 1930s. Dutch made his fortune in organized crime-related activities, including bootlegging and the numbers racket. Poor thing, he was weakened by two tax evasion trials that led to his rackets being threatened by competitor Lucky Luciano. However Dutch’s net worth was $7m, pretty impressive; he doubtless could have afforded one of today’s fancy-schmancy apartments on Roosevelt Island.

Oh, and another visitor was Charles Dickens. He described conditions at the Octagon, an asylum for the mentally ill then located on the northern part of the island and really part of the prison complex, in his American Notes (1842). 

The Octagon, now posh housing, was built in 1834. It served as the main entrance to the New York City Mental Health Hospital which opened in 1841.

Again this piece is inspired by the photography of PJ Lehrer who took the photo from the back or a cab. https://www.instagram.com/pjlehrer/


The writer is indebted to Wikipedia, ‘the people who keep knowledge free’, and he contributes to their cause. 

Monday, 6 April 2020

MARVELLOUS MANHATTEN AND A CRUSH ON ANDREW?

Again inspired by the photography of PJ Lehrer who lives on 2nd Avenue,  here is another NYC piece for the pot.  I am forever rummaging though her Instagram feed https://www.instagram.com/pjlehrer/ for pictures of a favourite city.

It must have been a real estate deal of Trumpian proportions when the Dutch bought the island from the Native Americans and called it New Amsterdam. Then the English took it over and changed the name to New York. 

The name Manhattan comes from the Munsi language spoke by Lenni Lenape people meaning ‘island of many hills’

Another notion suggests that that the name originates from one of three Munsi words. ‘Manahactanienk’ meaning ‘place of inebriation’*. 

However it is an exciting part of the world and the city must be now coping with lock down, shortages. However the Governor of New York, Democrat, is taking charge and setting hearts a flutter…
‘Hot for governor! Women confess they are developing 'MAJOR crushes' on Andrew Cuomo, 62, as the New York Democrat takes charge during COVID-19 pandemic’ 
CARLY STERN DAILYMAIL.COM 25 March 2020.

I love New York. 


*Little change there then

Saturday, 4 April 2020

A HOUSE FOR ESSEX


A HOUSE FOR ESSEX 

We were on a Curious Coast jaunt on the way back from Harwich in Essex, we discovered this wonderful confection. 

We parked at Wrabness Station and walked round the corner and down a lane at there it was, on the end of a field full of Wild Flowers. A House For Essex.

Designed by ‘national treasure’ Grayson Perry with help from the FAT architecture firm. Completed in 2015, the two-room bit of architectural flight of fancy. It is a bit of a challenge to draw; triangular tiles of alternating green and white leading up to a cascade of peaked roofs that look like they might collapse in on each other like a nesting doll. However once started you quickly see the repeats and rhythms of this remarkable place.
September 2019



FOOTNOTE 
Curious Coast Small Gems www.curiouscoast.co.uk
Now with time to reflect and revisit our 2000 photos, 5000 words and 70 drawings across 17 jaunts we’ve discovered some small places that deserve their own shout! This is one.

Wednesday, 1 April 2020

FISHGUARD: INVASIONS AND PIRATES

DRAWING ON THE SPOT: Lower Town Harbour

Lower Town Harbour Detail. Acrylic on  50 x 35 cm



February 19th.

We sat, sipping our beers, Sian and I, glad to be out of the rain. We’d been to the Royal Oak before a welcoming place in Fishguard’s town centre. 

What we did not know was that this public house was the site of the signing of surrender after the Battle of Fishguard. This brief campaign lasted from the 22nd until 24th February 1797. One thousand four hundred French soldiers landed near Fishguard yet surrendered two days later. 

It almost stopped raining so we popped down Lower Town, which is the old port of Fishguard situated at the mouth of the Gwaun River. This charming setting (in better weather) has been used as a location for many films, including ‘Under Milk Wood’ starring Richard Burton. 
Lower Town Harbour Quick Colour Preparatory:  Acrylic on  21 x 21 cm 
This coastline was the place of many bust ups and invasions. I began wondering why the French were so roundly defeated. I guessed that locals must have got their eye in eighteen years earlier. Lower Fishguard was held to ransom by the privateer Black Prince in 1779, the port was bombarded the town when the payment of a £1,000 ransom was refused. ‘Quite right lads, you can go now’ probably said a representative from the Town Council…

Friday, 27 March 2020

CARREG CENNEN, SLIPPING AND SLIDING


The Road to Carreg Cennen is paved with good intent
We drove to Carreg Cennen Castle NE of Carmarthen town. Its strong walls stare down from the hill. 

It started to rain. By the time we’d parked and paid our entrance and were walking to the battlements it poured with rain.

We turned back, and I slipped lost my footing and slithered five yards on the muddy slope*. 

So it will be for another day to explore towered square court and six towers, all of different shapes and gatehouse.

Many a slip...

This wondrous place in the 11th century, doubtless inspired by the Norman occupation.

One visitor who did not turn back was Owain Glyndŵr, together with 800 mates, attacked Carreg Cennen, but, although wreaking severe damage to the walls, failed to take the castle in early July 1403.

I thought the Wars of the Roses were purely a northern England thing however it appears that Carreg Cennen was a Lancastrian stronghold.

Across the years, ownership of the castle passed to the Vaughan and Cawdor families. From the 18th century it started to attract artists, Turner, led the way, sketched the castle in 1798.

*my only trousers were completely covered in mud so I repaired to Aldi for something to wear instead of, they only had running trousers. I did not let the name put me off and they have served me well.  See previous Post.

Monday, 23 March 2020

WET WET WET


Again looking back to February when things were so different.

Three days down in south Wales and the weather there was less than kind.

However in spite of the wind and rain we managed to get out and see some wonderful castles, coastlines, villages, and fields. 

And when the Sun did break through it was absolutely gorgeous. It was remarkable in its transformatory power: turning the oil refinery in Pembroke Dock into a horizon of minarets and cupolas. 

I felt I came back with material (drawings and photographs) for at least seven paintings.

Probably the most exciting drawing was one made on  West Beach, Angle. I took three minutes as a storm blew across the beach. 

I got absolutely soaked and almost blown away. However the feeling of making marks in a force eight gale was priceless. 



Ffynon Chape,  Llanddewi Velfrey
Castle in the air
Towards Carreg Cennen
Angle, West Beach in a force 8 
Lower Town Fishguard 

Wednesday, 18 March 2020

MARVELS OF MANCHESTER

How would L S Lowery depict Modern Manchester?

MARVELLOUS MANCHESTER 


Well as we battle with Coronavirus memories of places discovered and enjoyed will become even more important.  

Last week I was in Manchester as discovered what a wonderful place it is. It is remarkable for the way concrete and glass towers nestles along side Victorian flights of fancy in familiar red brick.

I was working in an office a short walk from the city centre. At the end of the first day I walked back to the hotel along several canal side paths. There are about 10 miles of canals running through central Manchester, dating back to the city's industrial heyday in the 18th and 19th Centuries.  Parts of the city with its gothic brickwork have a positively Venetian atmosphere!

My hotel room looked out on a cluster of skyscrapers nearing completion part of the new Deansgate Square area. What I was gazing across to is part of a seismic change to the city centre and highly controversial.

Oliver Wainwright in the Guardian, reporting in October 2019:
They will ultimately become 17- and 22-storey slabs that will in turn be dwarfed by a 41-storey tower, all surrounding the park with a glacial wall of “ultra-sleek urban homes”. And not a single one affordable.

This is MeadowSide, a £200m development by the Far East Consortium, a Hong Kong developer registered in the tax haven of the Cayman Islands. This site – once the gateway to medieval Manchester and depicted in the paintings of LS Lowry – is being ripped up to make way for 756 luxury homes, many already sold off-plan to investors in Hong Kong.

A glacial wall of “ultra-sleek urban homes?
Full story here   © 2020 Guardian News & Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 12 March 2020

THE SECRET OF CWM GWAUN

Cwm Gwaun    Acrylic on Paper   32 x 20 cm
On the road to Fishguard we turned off into Cwm Gwaun.

A steep-side valley flanked by fields and hard edged hills. An enchanted part of Pembrokeshire guarded by beech, hazel, ash and oak. Redstarts, marsh tit and tree creepers also keep watch.

The Rough Guide to Wales declares ‘Cwm Gwaun, the valley of the burbling River Gwaun is one of the great surprises of Pembrokeshire – a bucolic vale of impossibly narrow lanes, surrounded by the bleak shoulders of bare mountains.’

People in these parts continue to follow the tradition of the pre 1752 Julian calendar and celebrate New Year (Hen Galan) on 13 January. Children walk from house to house, and sing traditional Welsh language songs. In return, householders provide gifts of sweets and money.

Saturday, 7 March 2020

CHURCHING IN THE VALE OF THE WHITE HORSE


I billed this jaunt, to my cousin Wendy, as ‘lets go and see three Oxfordshire churches, three still on my list of not visited’.  

There was a feeling of familiarity on entering the first, St Swithun Compton Beauchamp, a treasure tucked away in the Downs. The feeling increased when stepping inside the grey Tuscan-like enormity of St Andrew’s Shrivenham. A full confession was in order when we got to All Saints Faringdon!



I had been to all three before with cycling chum Ricardo. When I got home I pulled Moleskine number 40 off the shelf and discovered it was in September 2013. All three and a couple more, it was on one of those September Sundays when the open churches for charity-ride cyclists.

Never mind Simon Jenkins* is at his most loquacious about all three churches

St Swithun ‘The interior is antiquarian rather than antique, fashioned for a modern enthusiast of the Anglo-Catholic rite.’*  
Certainly the place is festooned with representations of Our Lady.

All Saints Faringdon ‘… the interior is full of incident, much of it Norman or only a little later.’* 
There was an incidence of huge amounts of band equipment and associated junk that made enjoying the Unton family tombs a challenge’.

St Andrew Shrivenham  ‘The first impression is that Inigo Jones paid a flying visit, told a local builder to try Tuscan and then vanished.’*
I enjoyed making a sketch in the gloom of the chancel. 

*Copyright of and taken from England's Thousand Best Churches by Simon Jenkins an essential companion to the delights of churching.

It felt familiar, entering St Swithun Compton Beauchamp.

I had been to all three before with cycling chum Ricardo.

IN THE VALE OF THE WHITE HORSE

VALE OF THE WHITE HORSE CHURCHES 

I billed this jaunt, to my cousin Wendy, as ‘lets go and see three Oxfordshire churches, three still on my list of not visited’.  

There was a feeling of familiarity on entering the first, St Swithun Compton Beauchamp, a treasure tucked away in the Downs. The feeling increased on our stepping inside the grey Tuscan-like enormity of St Andrew’s Shrivenham. A full confession was in order when we got to All Saints Faringdon!

I had been to all three before with cycling chum Ricardo. When I got home I pulled Moleskine number 40 off the shelf and discovered it was in September 2013. All three and a couple more, it was on one of those September Sundays when the open churches for charity-ride cyclists.

Never mind Simon Jenkins* is at his most loquacious about all three

St Swithun ‘The interior is antiquarian rather than antique, fashioned for a modern enthusiast of the Anglo-Catholic rite.’*  
Certainly the place is festooned with representations of Our Lady.

All Saints Faringdon ‘… the interior is full of incident, much of it Norman or only a little later.’* 
There was an incidence of huge amounts of band equipment and associated junk that made enjoying the Unton family tombs a challenge’.

St Andrew Shrivenham  ‘The first impression is that Inigo Jones paid a flying visit, told a local builder to try Tuscan and then vanished.’*
I enjoyed making a sketch in the gloom of the chancel. 

*Copyright of and taken from England's Thousand Best Churches by Simon Jenkins an essential companion to the delights of churching.

Thursday, 27 February 2020

ELEVEN DAYS TO THE FALL OF TROY



March 8th is your last chance to see Troy: myth and reality at the British Museum. https://www.britishmuseum.org/exhibitions/troy-myth-and-reality

The show as exciting as 2004 film Troy. In fact a poster with Brad Pitt as a delicious Achilles and Miss Bloom as the cheeky Paris is part of the display. The BM’s exhibition might not gross the film’s box office‎ of ‎$497.4 million. However it does serve as an opportunity for the BM to bring out and display some Roman marble masonry and Athenian bric-a-brac. Chatsworth House and the V&A have generously chipped in to help us enjoy some interesting things on which to gaze (over the shoulders of the hoards).
The Wounded Achilles, on loan from The Devonshire Collections - Chatsworth House 

Delightful Trojan Bric-a-brac



The British Museum remains a delight. Seek out Room 67 - Korea 300 BC to present if you want a real and peaceful treat. Avoid any part of the museum at ground level  - crowded beyond imagination most days.


Saturday, 22 February 2020

PAINTING THE LIBRARY

Every couple of months I run an afternoon art sessions in two local public libraries.



The idea, originally, was to come in an talk about my work, it became readily apparent that people are keener on having a go themselves, ask advice and try out materials that are new to them. (Rather than have me talk about me).



So now I pitch up with paper, materials, water jars and an two simple table sets to draw and the assembled group just get to it. Brilliant!

I never cease to be amazed and excited about what people achieve: lovely, expressive work.


Wednesday, 19 February 2020

THE ROAD TO CROESGOCH

The road to Croes-goch from Abereiddy: pastel sketch for a painting

THE ROAD TO CROES-GOCH

Croes-goch lies on one of the pilgrimage routes to St David's cathedral. Nearby, at Mesur y Dorth, a specially carved stone, indicates a spot where people shared their bread before the last stage of their journey. The stone is still clearly visible just to the north of the crossroads. 

The name of the village is thought to originate from a fierce battle, which occurred near the village. The fight resulted in so great a slaughter of men the myth tells river of blood that formed a cross, Croes-Goch translated mean red cross.

The leading painter John Knapp Fisher lived and worked here in Trevigan Cottage until his death in 2015. The cottage is gallery is often open selling prints of his work.  I am greatly inspired by his work, paintings that capture the skies and seas and villages of this remarkable country, characteristic are a tiny collection of cottages, perhaps a chapel, crouched together under a dark sky.

Sunday, 16 February 2020

DRYSLWYN CASTLE: PHEW WHAT A VIEW

Dryslwyn Castle  Acrylic on Board  30 x 20 cm



From the top of a steep hill on which perches what is left of Dryslwyn Castle you can see the wonderful oxbow curves of the Afon Tywi (River Towy). 

Seventy-five precious miles of lovely waterway, this is the longest river entirely flowing within Wales from the Cambrian Mountains, through steep forests of Tywi and south-westwards into dear Carmarthenshire. Here the river meets up with the River Taf together they into Carmarthen Bay.  

Its lower estuary is guarded by Lansteffan Castle, another Norman bastion of which there are so many hereabouts.

Famed for big sea trout each spring,  Salmo trutta swim up stream to breed in the tributaries. The Towy boasts a population of otters and grey seals are common in the lower reaches, chasing the sea trout and salmon upstream! 

In 1932 angler Alec Allen, fishing the Tywi near Nantgaredig, caught by far the biggest fish ever taken on rod and line in fresh water in Britain. He landed a sturgeon (Acipwienser sturio) weighing 388 lb. and nine feet two inches in length. 

Friday, 31 January 2020

SOLVA: LOOK TOWARDS THE SEA

Solva Harbour: lifeline and leisure portnow

Solva harbour must hold many stories with its connections to the sea hereabouts. It was a lifeline for the remote village of Solva high on the headland before the road to St. Davids was built.  In these parts the entire coast comes with its chronicles of shipwrecks; for this was once a busy port where it was possible in the 1800’s to buy passage to America.

OUT FOR A DUCK
Every year on Easter Monday Solva hosts a Duck Race for charity. The ducks are released into the River Solva near Middle Mill and float down stream to Solva harbour. The winner is the first to cross under the footbridge in lower Solva car park.


BLACK DAB-FILLED SEA
In June 2014 Solva was used as a location for the filming of Dylan Thomas's Under Milkwood.

'And you alone can hear the invisible starfall, 
the darkest-before dawn minutely dew grazed
stir of the black, dab-filled sea where the Arethusa, the
Curlew and the Skylark, the ZanzibarRhiannon, the Rover, the Cormorant and The Star of Wales tilt and ride.'

Dylan Thomas, Under Milk Wood: A Play for Voices (1954)



Tuesday, 28 January 2020

ABEREIDDY ALL ALONE

Abereiddy Beach Pebbles and Slate

It was one of those days in winter when it never seems to get light. We pulled up at Abereiddy beach. Close by its small hamlet of houses and cottages huddled together for warm. 

We walked down to the water’s edge and back, across lots and lots and lots of lovely pebbles and extraordinarily dark sand made of pounded grey slate. Slate mining was once a big business on this part of the coast. 

Ruins of a small group of slate houses known as The Street remain near the beach, their stones peering across at you through the headland grass. These were built for the quarry workers of the ‘Blue Lagoon’ only abandoned after a flood in the early 1900’s.

 The ‘Blue Lagoon’ itself is a beautiful little harbour – the hamlet’s breached quarry – round the corner just to the north. Its name ‘blue’ because when the sun does shine the slate under the sea causes it to shimmer all shades of turquoise.


Duw Bendithia


Thursday, 23 January 2020

RETIREMENT ACCOMMODATION?

The Charles. Start saving now.

Another piece inspired by my favourite photographer New Yorker, Professor Lehrer.
This is a exciting tower on 1st Avenue that offers some interesting accommodation options.
Single apartments sell for around $6,750,000, and as you might imagine lots of space: full-floor residences that open up to over 3,300 square feet of space.
However you can never have enough room, witness the gross developments here in Beaconsfield. The Charles Building outshines them:

The WALL STREET JOURNAL reported 
'A family that buys together stays together. On New York’s Upper East Side, buyers related to each other have purchased a total of five units that span the top six floors of the Charles condominium, creating two massive units, for a total of $58.635 million.'

Copyright ©2020 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, 20 January 2020

BARNEYS: EVERYTHING MUST GO

Barneys  Everything Must be Sold

COR’ BLIMEY! BARNEYS

The photography of my New York correspondent, Professor P.J. Lehrer, never ceases to impress and inspire. This small study is from her photograph of a Barneys window. 

For those of us planning to do a bit of shopping in NY this year be aware the city’s retail scene is in a state of flux, like London.  Across the US Barneys is planning store closures and their flagship New York store is relocating inside Saks Fifth Avenue, so my correspondent informs me; now that is more bang for your buck.

Enjoy New York without the air travel, follow P.J.Lehrer on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/pjlehrer/?hl=en

Friday, 17 January 2020

ST ANDREWS BEACH

West Sands Beach 40 x 70cm  Gouach on Paper


This is a gouache and ink painting, a commission, of West Sands St Andrews beach in Fife. (Gosh I have been busy). The beach became famous as a training run in the 1981 film, 'Chariots of Fire', about Olympic athletes Eric Liddell and Harald Abrahams.

The ever-handy online guide WALKING HIGHLANDS gives us the full picture! https://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/fife-stirling/west-sands.shtml

‘Stretch your legs on the spectacular and vast sandy beach made famous in the film, 'Chariots of Fire'. The route then passes through Eden Estuary nature reserve before a track leads between the famous golf courses with good views over fine buildings of St Andrews.

©2006-2018 walkhighlands.co.uk

Tuesday, 14 January 2020

TOTALLY BRILL



My painting of Brill Church was a pre-Christmas commission, a timorous watercolour, from a sunny photograph, turned out quite well.  I was keen to discover more about this place

All Saints’ Church sits on a hill in the village and apparently this lovely church started life as a royal chapel to an adjacent royal palace in the 11th century. Edward the Confessor* owned the parish at one stage.

The earliest part of the church is the nave, built in the 12th century (Normans were soon at  it) and over time it has been altered. A Mr J. Oldrid Scott rebuilt the entire church in 1888, with the good sense to incorporate some of the older bits. 

THE EXCELLENT CORPUS OF ROMANESQUE SCULPTURE IN BRITAIN AND IRELAND   INCLUDES BRILL IN ITS SURVEY

‘The doorways have been restored in the resetting and more recently, but enough original stone remains to confirm their form. The fat angle roll and cushion capitals are typical of a date in the first two decades of the 12thc.’

© 2020 The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland   Please discover more about Brill on this wonderful website https://www.crsbi.ac.uk/site/946/

*Edward the Confessor was the first Anglo-Saxon and the only king of England to be canonised. He ruled from 1042 to 1066. Edward was the son of Æthelred the Unready.

Wednesday, 8 January 2020

A BRIDGE AND A GORGE


The Avon Gorge
Over recent weeks I have spent a fair few days in Bristol.

Rosie the Puppy and I like to drive up to Clifton Downs and particularly fair part of the city and go for a stroll and then take coffee at the excellent café attached to the Clifton Observatory.

Craving Rosie’s indulgence drawings are made and then the inevitable interest is sparked on ‘Brunel’s bridge’ and indeed the gorge of the River Avon that is spans.


A nice bridge


The Avon gorge runs south to north through a limestone ridge 1.5 miles (2.4 km) west of Bristol city centre, and runs about 3 miles (5 km) from the mouth of the river at Avonmouth. Throughout the city’s history the gorge has been an important transport route, carrying the River Avon, major roads and two railways.

As importantly the Avon Gorge is the subject of mediaeval mythology. The myth tells a tale of two giant brothers, Goram and Vincent, who constructed the gorge. One variation holds that Vincent and Goram were constructing the gorge together and Goram fell asleep, to be accidentally killed by Vincent's pickaxe.

THE BRIDGE
At the Clifton Suspension Bridge the Gorge is more than 700 feet wide and 300 feet deep. William Henry Barlow and John Hawkshaw build it based on an earlier design by Isambard Kingdom Brunel.

BRIDGE BY THE NUMBERS 
Clearance: 245 ft. (75 m) above high water level
Dip of chains: 70 ft. (21.34 m)
Height of towers: 86 ft. (26 m) above deck
Overall length: 1,352 ft. (412 m)
Overall width: 31 ft. (9.45 m)
Span: 702 ft. 3 in (214.05 m)

Fascinating facts from Wikipedia and gleaned with thanks. The writer is a regular contributor the Wikipedia funding, as we all should be. 

Saturday, 4 January 2020

RAZOR'S EDGE

HIGH WINDS or some strange sea conditions had spread razor clam shells over Pendine beach like confetti at an Essex wedding. I collected just a few for onward despatch to an ace a team of shell collectors in Kelvedon in Essex.

A made a drawing


A LITTLE RESEARCH YIELD RICH INSIGHT
Razor clams are strange creatures - technically bivalves like regular clams and mussels, their fine white flesh resembles squid more than some of its closer relatives. They live burrowed in the sand on sheltered beaches, and at low tide you may be able to spot the 'keyhole' openings to their burrows.

AND IMPORTANT ADVICE FOR HARVESTING OR BUYING RAZOR CLAMS

Razor Clams usually move or retract when you touch them. ... To keep the razor clams alive, make sure they are all alive when you buy them that they are packed properly in some paper that they are not sealed in a plastic bag as they can suffocate.

Copyright and many thanks to 

Wednesday, 1 January 2020

ENJOY THE CHILTERNS BY TRAIN

It is good to travel in November through the train-given landscape.  


At last one can appreciate the countryside without the distraction of foliage.

Two quick sketches made from my train carriage.

The opening lines for November in John Clare’s Shepherds Calendar ring true

'THE landscape sleeps in mist from morn till noon;
And, if the sun looks through, tis with a face
Beamless and pale and round, as if the moon,